careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

SPORTS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: This position is similar to the news director position. Sports directors often handle the play-by-play coverage of local sporting events. Stations that do a lot of sports sometimes hire a "color" announcer to complement the play-by-play talent.

Generally, this is not an entry-level position and requires a good deal of experience, knowledge and education.

NEWS REPORTERS

WHAT THEY DO: The key "front-line" people in the news department are the beat reporters. They are on-the-scene at every kind of event, and larger organizations may compartmentalize assignments, such as health reporter, education reporter, entertainment reporter, etc.

Local news reporters must be excellent writers, capable of working quickly and accurately to sum up the key elements of a news story and make it understandable and relevant to the audience. In today's new media, reporters must be able to write to all digital media, including social networks.

REQUIREMENTS: Often reporters can enter smaller markets before they have completed their degree in broadcast journalism. Nonetheless, a college degree will be necessary to move onto larger markets and more responsibility.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: A Community Relations Director plans, coordinates and executes a station's services and programs that are developed to respond to the needs of the community. Often called a Public Affairs director, this position spearheads keeping a station in touch with it's listeners and viewers.

REQUIREMENTS: Community Relations positions will require a knowledge and understanding of the station's demographic. In addition, many positions will require a familiarity with computer programs such as web-based content management systems, design programs and office products.

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