careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

CHIEF ENGINEER

WHAT THEY DO: The chief engineer is responsible for the technology necessary to put the station's broadcast on the air. The engineering staff works to maintain broadcasting capabilities and provide quick solutions to problems that may arise with the transmitter, tower, satellite receiver and other related equipment. The chief engineer is the head of the technical staff.

REQUIREMENTS: More often than not, a technical background, including education is required for this position. The Society of Broadcast Engineers offer classes and certification programs that would suffice for many engineering positions.

NEWS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The news director supervises the news department. An effective ND must understand budgeting, personnel management and the technical aspects of broadcasting. In addition to having a firm understanding of the community service role of broadcast journalism, he or she must also have solid news judgment - the ability to determine which stories are most informative and of the greatest value to the local broadcast consumer.

REQUIREMENTS: This is not an entry-level position and requires a good deal of experience, knowledge and education.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

WHAT THEY DO: As a newsroom leader, the executive producer must demonstrate strong news judgment, be able to develop creative story ideas and work with producers and reporters to execute those plans. EPs coordinate the content and presentation of broadcasts under the direction of the managing editor and news director.

REQUIREMENTS: Executive producers have a great deal of experience in the newsroom. Usually, a 4 year degree in Journalism, Communications or related field is required along with experience in news producing and newsroom management.

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