careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

TRAFFIC DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: A station's traffic manager collects data from other departments in order to prepare a minute-by-minute schedule for the broadcast day. The traffic person is the daily link between the sales department and programming department, keeping up-to-date commercial time availability.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level traffic/programming staff. Nonetheless, candidates should have completed high school, have broadcast experience and be very well-organized.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: A Community Relations Director plans, coordinates and executes a station's services and programs that are developed to respond to the needs of the community. Often called a Public Affairs director, this position spearheads keeping a station in touch with it's listeners and viewers.

REQUIREMENTS: Community Relations positions will require a knowledge and understanding of the station's demographic. In addition, many positions will require a familiarity with computer programs such as web-based content management systems, design programs and office products.

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: In radio, program directors are generally responsible for more than a single station. They work closely with the entire on-air staff to develop exciting promotions that enhance the programs on the air. For TV, the programming manager is responsible for maintaining traffic logs, scheduling services, etc. The PD's programming objectives support the goals of the general manager and the general sales manager.

REQUIREMENTS: In order to coordinate various departments, this position generally goes to highly-experienced station personnel.

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