careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

RECEPTIONIST

WHAT THEY DO: The duties of the receptionist vary according to the size of the station. This position often is "the face" of a station and requires friendly personnel with a good understanding of all the aspects of how a station operates.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level reception staff. Nonetheless, candidates should have completed high school, have phone system experience and be personable.

NEWS REPORTERS

WHAT THEY DO: The key "front-line" people in the news department are the beat reporters. They are on-the-scene at every kind of event, and larger organizations may compartmentalize assignments, such as health reporter, education reporter, entertainment reporter, etc.

Local news reporters must be excellent writers, capable of working quickly and accurately to sum up the key elements of a news story and make it understandable and relevant to the audience. In today's new media, reporters must be able to write to all digital media, including social networks.

REQUIREMENTS: Often reporters can enter smaller markets before they have completed their degree in broadcast journalism. Nonetheless, a college degree will be necessary to move onto larger markets and more responsibility.

PRODUCER

WHAT THEY DO: This person develops and organizes local programs and is responsible for scripting, story development, booking of guests and overseeing field production and editing.

REQUIREMENTS: Organizational skills and the ability to multi-task are essential for any TV producer.

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